Yes, ‘Quarantine Fatigue’ Is Real. Here’s How to Cope

Yes, ‘Quarantine Fatigue’ Is Real. Here’s How to Cope

It’s been more than 2 months since self-isolation and shuttered businesses became the norm in most of North America due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

While there’s talk of gradual re-openings in some areas, we still could be more than a year away from life returning to normal.

As “quarantine fatigue” takes root, experts say it’s worth checking in with yourself and others to deal with this uncertainty in a healthy way.

“A lot of people describe being really fatigued at the end of the day,” Mary Fristad, PhD, ABPP, a psychologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, said.

 

Helping yourself

With the comforting routines of day-to-day life disrupted, most experts suggest creating new routines.

Physical fitness is something that could fall by the wayside with gyms closed and people cooped up at home.

“A lot of people aren’t exercising, so it’s very easy to get into a sedentary lifestyle, which can contribute to not sleeping well at night, which contributes to fatigue during the daytime,” Fristad said.

To combat this, Fristad suggests sticking to some kind of routine or schedule, even if it isn’t as rigid as the pre-pandemic norm.

Virtual exercise classes are widely available in this new era of video chats. With spring weather taking hold, it’s also a good time to responsibly enjoy some sunshine.

It’s really important to maintain some alone time. It differs from person to person in how much we need, but we all need the ability to decompress.

While a global pandemic may not immediately inspire thoughts of gratitude, mindfulness is a useful technique during this trying time.

It’s important to remember that people are resilient and that we have the ability to get through hard times. The pandemic and social distancing guidelines provide us with new opportunities to be creative, work differently, and come together as family, friends, colleagues, and community.

 

Helping others

Many people, particularly those who don’t have children living at home or who are already accustomed to working from home, haven’t seen their lives significantly disrupted.

While people in this demographic may be coping adequately, they likely have friends or loved ones who aren’t doing so well.

It may not be possible to gather with friends or give a hug to an extended family member, but technology makes it fairly straightforward to check in with friends and loved ones.

 

 

 

 

 

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